You must do the thing you think you cannot do

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Photo by Ai@ce

I have had a task that I kept putting off: cleaning up the piles of clutter on the floor beside my bed.  I had stacked it, piled it, put it in baskets, sorted it… but it never went anywhere.  It just lay there, a mess about six feet long and two feet wide.  I was physically confronted by it at least twice a day (getting in and out of bed), but it preyed on my mind continually.

Last night – by means of an “enlightening interchange” – I realized just how much the bedroom clutter was bothering David.  Although he insisted that he was not saying I had to tackle it then and there, I decided (in a huff, I must admit) to make a point of cleaning it up before morning, even if I had to stay up all night.

Luckily for me, Eleanor Roosevelt was right.  I did the thing I thought I could not do, and it was neither as difficult nor as lengthy a task as I thought.  The clutter is gone.  Some of it was merely relocated (paperwork that needs filing or sorting was put in the office, for example), but at least it is where it belongs, and not in some temporary holding pattern in the bedside airspace.

After we both cooled down, David and I had some meaningful dialogue about how we can support each other’s needs, even if it means stretching out of our comfort zones.  I will try harder to get things tidy and keep them that way.  He will try harder to do thoughtful things for me.  As he said, hopefully we can “get on an upward spiral.”  I’d like that.

  • {Clutter} released: Nine magazines, two (*gasp* unread!) newspapers, one book, various papers I realized I no longer need.